Salem witch trials essay

The House Committee on Un-American Activities (generally known as HUAC) also investigated communism within Hollywood, calling a number of playwrights, directors and actors known for left-wing views to testify. Although some of these, including film director Elia Kazan, testified for the committee to avoid prison sentences, the Hollywood Ten, a group of entertainers, refused to testify and were convicted of contempt and sentenced to up to one year in prison. Over three hundred other entertainers were placed on a blacklist for possible communist views and were thus forbidden to work for major Hollywood studios (many of these were writers who worked under pseudonyms at the time, including Dalton Trumbo and Michael Wilson). Arthur Miller was one of these blacklisted. The blacklist prevented these men from receiving screen credit during this time, until actor Kirk Douglas pushed for Trumbo to receive screen credit for his adaptation of Spartacus for Stanley Kubrick in 1960.

The witch trials in Early Modern Europe came in waves and then subsided. There were trials in the 15th and early 16th centuries, but then the witch scare went into decline, before becoming a major issue again and peaking in the 17th century. What had previously been a belief that some people possessed supernatural abilities (which were sometimes used to protect the people) now became a sign of a pact between the people with supernatural abilities and the devil. To justify the killings, Protestant Christianity and its proxy secular institutions deemed witchcraft as being associated to wild Satanic ritual parties in which there was much naked dancing and cannibalistic infanticide . [45] It was also seen as heresy for going against the first of the ten commandments (You shall have no other gods before me) or as violating majesty , in this case referring to the divine majesty, not the worldly. [46] Further, scripture specifically decreed that "thou shalt not suffer a witch to live" (Exodus 22:18), which many believed.

The characters in the play were based upon real people who judged or were judged in hysteria. You'll close the book with a comma-like state, as there are a lot of ambiguities in it. But be sure to read it to the end, don't lose this superb possibility. Enter Your Essay Topic Here:

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Sources:
Upham, Charles W. Salem Witchcraft: With an Account of Salem Village and a History of Opinions on Witchcraft . Wiggin and Lunt, 1867.
Crewe, Sabrina and Michael V. Uschan. The Salem Witch Trials . Gareth Stevens Publishing, 2005.
Upham, Charles Wentworth. Salem Witchcraft and Cotton Mather: A Reply . Morrisiana: 1869
Jackson, Shirley. The Witchcraft of Salem Village . Random House, 1956.
Fowler, Samuel Page. An Account of the Life, Character, & C., of the Rev. Samuel Parris of Salem Village . William Ives and George W. Pease, 1857.
“Session Laws.” The 190th General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts , ., /Laws/SessionLaws/Acts/2001/Chapter122
“The 1692 Salem Witch Trials.” The Salem Witch Museum , ., /education/salem-witch-trials
Blumberg, Jess. “A Brief History of the Salem Witch Trials.”  Smithsonian Magazine. Smithsonian Institute, 23 Oct. 2007, /history/a-brief-history-of-the-salem-witch-trials-175162489/

Salem witch trials essay

salem witch trials essay

Sources:
Upham, Charles W. Salem Witchcraft: With an Account of Salem Village and a History of Opinions on Witchcraft . Wiggin and Lunt, 1867.
Crewe, Sabrina and Michael V. Uschan. The Salem Witch Trials . Gareth Stevens Publishing, 2005.
Upham, Charles Wentworth. Salem Witchcraft and Cotton Mather: A Reply . Morrisiana: 1869
Jackson, Shirley. The Witchcraft of Salem Village . Random House, 1956.
Fowler, Samuel Page. An Account of the Life, Character, & C., of the Rev. Samuel Parris of Salem Village . William Ives and George W. Pease, 1857.
“Session Laws.” The 190th General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts , ., /Laws/SessionLaws/Acts/2001/Chapter122
“The 1692 Salem Witch Trials.” The Salem Witch Museum , ., /education/salem-witch-trials
Blumberg, Jess. “A Brief History of the Salem Witch Trials.”  Smithsonian Magazine. Smithsonian Institute, 23 Oct. 2007, /history/a-brief-history-of-the-salem-witch-trials-175162489/

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