Nurse and friar lawrence essay

In this scene we are introduced to Friar Lawrence as he meditates on the duality of good and evil that exists in all things. Speaking of medicinal plants, the friar claims that, though everything in nature has a useful purpose, it can also lead to misfortune if used improperly: “For naught so vile that on the earth doth live / But to the earth some special good doth give, / Nor aught so good but strain’d from that fair use / Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse: / Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied; / And vice sometime’s by action dignified” (–22). At the end of this passage, the friar’s rumination turns toward a broader application; he speaks of how good may be perverted to evil and evil may be purified by good. The friar tries to put his theories to use when he agrees to marry Romeo and Juliet; he hopes that the good of their love will reverse the evil of the hatred between the feuding families. Unfortunately, he later causes the flipside of his theory to come into play: the plan involving a sleep-inducing potion, which he intends to preserve Romeo and Juliet’s marriage and love, results in both of their deaths.

Nurse and friar lawrence essay

nurse and friar lawrence essay

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