New essays on the knowability paradox

An essential feature of religious experience across many cultures is the intuitive feeling of God's presence. More than any rituals or doctrines, it is this experience that anchors religious faith, yet it has been largely ignored in the scientific literature on religion.

"... [Dr. Wathey's] book delves into the biological origins of this compelling feeling, attributing it to innate neural circuitry that evolved to promote the mother-child bond...[He] argues that evolution has programmed the infant brain to expect the presence of a loving being who responds to the child's needs. As the infant grows into adulthood, this innate feeling is eventually transferred to the realm of religion, where it is reactivated through the symbols, imagery, and rituals of worship. The author interprets our various conceptions of God in biological terms as illusory supernormal stimuli that fill an emotional and cognitive vacuum left over from infancy. 

These insights shed new light on some of the most vexing puzzles of religion, like:

Like any industry, writing and research require serious quality control measures and we consider that our biggest task. There are several mechanism that we have adopted over the years that help us meet all our guarantees on quality and deadlines. Every paper typed by our writers is electronically scanned by a plagiarism detection utility and later manually reviewed by a trusted editor who is likely to spot plagiarized content. Yet, the most effective tool is the thorough examination that every one of our writers had to go through at the hiring stage. There have been numerous cases of cheating on our entrance-tests and dishonest writers who cheated there would eventually cheat on the job. The end result of that war on plagiarism looks promising: Every one of our client is guaranteed 100% authentic non-plagiarized writing (money back guarantee).

The two speakers in the book are Theophilus ("loving God" in Greek ), [2] who represents the views of Leibniz, and Philalethes ("loving truth" in Greek), [3] who represents those of Locke. The famous rebuttal to the empiricist thesis about the provenance of ideas appears at the beginning of Book II : "Nothing is in the mind without being first in the senses, except for the mind itself". [4] All of Locke's major arguments against innate ideas are criticized at length by Leibniz, who defends an extreme view of innate cognition, according to which all thoughts and actions of the soul are innate. [5] In addition to his discussion of innate ideas, Leibniz offers penetrating critiques of Locke's views on personal identity, free will, mind-body dualism, language, necessary truth, and Locke's attempted proof of the existence of God.

Since then, I tried to answer most of their questions. This year, I am so swamped with tutoring students, however, that I’m not able to answer all the questions right now. But I have noticed that many cover the same ground—even though the topics range from someone’s world of books, to playing tennis, to making cookies, to an ill family member, etc. So I pulled some of the questions that I thought are more common, along with my answers, in hopes they might answer questions still lingering out there. See below. read more…

New essays on the knowability paradox

new essays on the knowability paradox

Since then, I tried to answer most of their questions. This year, I am so swamped with tutoring students, however, that I’m not able to answer all the questions right now. But I have noticed that many cover the same ground—even though the topics range from someone’s world of books, to playing tennis, to making cookies, to an ill family member, etc. So I pulled some of the questions that I thought are more common, along with my answers, in hopes they might answer questions still lingering out there. See below. read more…

Media:

new essays on the knowability paradoxnew essays on the knowability paradoxnew essays on the knowability paradoxnew essays on the knowability paradox