Essays on tuberculosis

By 1954, the average time a patient spent at Firland had been cut in half. Mortality rates at Firland plummeted from 31 percent in 1948 to 6 percent in 1954. In 1957, a team of national officials evaluated Firland and proclaimed it one of the most outstanding sanatoria in the country. A 1948 affiliation with the University of Washington Medical School funneled a steady supply of medical students, nursing students, and resident physicians through Firland. This in turn attracted excellent medical personnel from around the country to Firland’s staff.

Jean-Marc Rosier          "I recommend that you consider the contrast between the flexibly nosed tapir of South America and
Photodisc      the more extravagantly nosed elephant of Africa." Let us begin with a thumbnail sketch of the biogeography of the globe when Columbus set sail. Everyone in the Americas was a Amerindian. Everyone in Eurasia and Africa was a person who shared no common ancestor with Amerindians for at the very least 10,000 years. (I omit the subpolar peoples, such as the Inuit, from this analysis because they never stopped passing back and forth across the Bering Strait). The plants and animals of the tropical continents of Africa and South America differed sharply from each other and from those in any other parts of the world. I recommend that you consider the contrast between the flexibly nosed tapir of South America and the more extravagantly nosed elephant of Africa. The plants and animals of the more northerly continents, Eurasia and North America, differed not so sharply, but clearly differed. European bison and American buffalo (which should also be called bison) were very much alike, but Europe had nothing like the rattlesnake nor North America anything like the humped camel.

Essays on tuberculosis

essays on tuberculosis

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