Citing authors

Have you ever been friends with a pair of identical twins? Twins who looked so alike that, at first, telling them apart all hinged on finding that distinguishing freckle, or hoping someone else would call them by their names so you could memorize what clothes each was wearing that day? In the social sciences, there is a longstanding tradition of twin research, but this post refers to twins of another kind: reference twins. Specifically, this post addresses how to cite multiple articles by the same authors that were published in the same year so that everyone can easily tell them apart.

In a 2000 article in the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy titled “The Right to Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia,” Gorsuch’s writing aligns closely with a 1985 Duquesne Law Review article about euthanasia in colonial America. Gorsuch describes laws in colonial Virginia, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, South Carolina, North Carolina and Pennsylvania in the same order and with similar quotations as the Duquesne article. But Gorsuch never cites the article in that passage, instead only repeating the same sources that it relied on.

Oxford's academic guidance for plagiarism states that “paraphrasing the work of others by altering a few words and changing their order, or by closely following the structure of their argument, is plagiarism if you do not give due acknowledgement to the author whose work you are using.”

Citing authors

citing authors

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